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The Man in the Water

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When Shaun finds a dead body floating in the lake of a quiet mining town in outback Queensland, he immediately reports it to the police. But when he returns to the site with the constable, the body is gone. Determined to reveal the truth, Shaun and his best friend, Will, open their own investigation. But what they discover is far more sinister than a mining mishap or a When Shaun finds a dead body floating in the lake of a quiet mining town in outback Queensland, he immediately reports it to the police. But when he returns to the site with the constable, the body is gone. Determined to reveal the truth, Shaun and his best friend, Will, open their own investigation. But what they discover is far more sinister than a mining mishap or a murder, and reveals a darkness below the surface of their small town. David Burton is the author of How to Be Happy, winner of the 2014 Text Prize for Young Adult and Children's Writing.


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When Shaun finds a dead body floating in the lake of a quiet mining town in outback Queensland, he immediately reports it to the police. But when he returns to the site with the constable, the body is gone. Determined to reveal the truth, Shaun and his best friend, Will, open their own investigation. But what they discover is far more sinister than a mining mishap or a When Shaun finds a dead body floating in the lake of a quiet mining town in outback Queensland, he immediately reports it to the police. But when he returns to the site with the constable, the body is gone. Determined to reveal the truth, Shaun and his best friend, Will, open their own investigation. But what they discover is far more sinister than a mining mishap or a murder, and reveals a darkness below the surface of their small town. David Burton is the author of How to Be Happy, winner of the 2014 Text Prize for Young Adult and Children's Writing.

30 review for The Man in the Water

  1. 5 out of 5

    The Nerd Daily

    Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Annie Deo The Man in the Water is a coming-of-age YA thriller set in a rural mining town in Queensland and follows a teenager who launches an investigation into a mysterious dead body which promptly vanishes after he leaves to report it. The author mentions that this book was based on his time in regional Queensland where he experienced a new and different culture in their mining towns, inspiring its depiction in the form of the issues Shaun and Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Annie Deo The Man in the Water is a coming-of-age YA thriller set in a rural mining town in Queensland and follows a teenager who launches an investigation into a mysterious dead body which promptly vanishes after he leaves to report it. The author mentions that this book was based on his time in regional Queensland where he experienced a new and different culture in their mining towns, inspiring its depiction in the form of the issues Shaun and his town face, and how Shaun’s character is developed. It’s an eye-opening read and immediately apparent that the author has written from real life knowledge as the reader is transported to Shaun’s dusty dry hometown, withering away in the oppressive heat and from the loss of resources as profit-driven businesses lay off local workers to invest in casual workers instead. Shaun knows something of the greedy corporate mindset as his father suffered a debilitating injury due to long hours in unsafe working conditions, leading to him taking his own life out of despair and shame. This background informs how the other characters respond to Shaun, suspecting that his report of a dead body is based on unresolved grief and acting out because he needs help. The topic of mental health is a recurring theme and Shaun’s mother repeatedly brings up therapy, doing her best to enrol Shaun in counselling sessions to help him manage his emotions and behaviour. Of course Shaun is less than impressed as he DID find a dead body, but representation of mental health issues has helped to stigmatise the condition over time and it’s always welcome to see awareness being raised in books aimed at a younger audience. I appreciated that the author also includes a list of resources at the end of the book to assist anyone in need of help. The murder mystery is tricky and convoluted, throwing up more puzzling questions the deeper the boys dig into it. There’s a ton of intrigue and near-claustrophobic paranoia as the number of suspects pile up, including those in close proximity to Shaun, and it’s a very satisfying conundrum to mull over. I did finally work out the answer, but only on chapter 33 out of 39! The author has a delicate balance to maintain between keeping the mystery confusing enough for readers not to pick it apart early in the book, but also sowing in seeds of information that the teenage boys can investigate and succeed in gaining insight from without it being completely unrealistic. This can’t turn into CS: North Queensland after all! It was handled superbly as Shaun and Will felt wholly believable, pursuing their case in a manner that made sense for teenage boys and getting ahead without simply lucking into clues through sheer plot convenience. A tentative romance is included in the background, as Shaun’s next main priority besides solving the murder is trying to summon the courage to reveal his feelings to long-time crush Megan. However the focus is more on Shaun’s feelings about Megan rather than developing her as a character in her own right, which makes sense as this book is primarily about Shaun’s emotional journey and his growth shown through the way he interacts with those around him. The friendship between Shaun and Will in particular is heartwarming and endearing, with their light-hearted banter offering a welcome counterpoint to the more serious moments dealing with death and depression. This is a wonderfully thoughtful and intriguing story that has crossover appeal to adults and younger teenagers, exploring important messages as well as entertaining the reader. A captivating fast-paced read that is recommended for everyone.

  2. 5 out of 5

    K.

    Trigger warnings: death, grief, mental health, death of a parent (in the past), (view spoiler)[suicide, murder, cheating (hide spoiler)] . I am 100% here for more novels set in small town Australia, especially when they're not straight up contemporaries. I also thoroughly enjoyed that this had a 14 year old protagonist rather than the typical 17 year old protagonists that YA is riddled with of late. Anyway. I really really liked this. I liked the characters. I liked the setting. I liked the Trigger warnings: death, grief, mental health, death of a parent (in the past), (view spoiler)[suicide, murder, cheating (hide spoiler)] . I am 100% here for more novels set in small town Australia, especially when they're not straight up contemporaries. I also thoroughly enjoyed that this had a 14 year old protagonist rather than the typical 17 year old protagonists that YA is riddled with of late. Anyway. I really really liked this. I liked the characters. I liked the setting. I liked the writing and the pacing. I liked the very low-key romance, which is super age appropriate given how old the protagonist is. And I liked the mystery side of things. This isn't a particularly long book but it packed a solid punch and I'd strongly recommend it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kelly (Diva Booknerd)

    Woven throughout The Man in the Water is the reoccurring theme of mental health, community responsibility and removing mental illness discrimination, especially in traditionally male dominated workplaces. While Australia strides towards inclusion and equality, toxic masculinity is an issue rarely acknowledged or discussed. Young men are expected to appear stoic and detached and to appear otherwise is often seen as weakness. This is especially prevalent in male dominated workplaces where Woven throughout The Man in the Water is the reoccurring theme of mental health, community responsibility and removing mental illness discrimination, especially in traditionally male dominated workplaces. While Australia strides towards inclusion and equality, toxic masculinity is an issue rarely acknowledged or discussed. Young men are expected to appear stoic and detached and to appear otherwise is often seen as weakness. This is especially prevalent in male dominated workplaces where employees are essentially discouraged from expressing concerns and mental health issues. In the incidents of the Rosewood Mine, employees are separated from their families, exposed to unsafe conditions, unsupported by their employer and intimidated by union delegates. The Man in the Water encourages discussions surrounding mental health, suicide and neglect within our small town communities. Communities often without mental health professionals and counselling services. The uniquely Australian narrative is authentic and superbly written, the epitome of compassionate and conscientious young adult literature. Read my full review here

  4. 4 out of 5

    Selina

    Shaun is a kid in a small mining town in rural Qld. One day, he spots a man floating face down in a lake. He rushes to report his finding to the police, but when they come back, the body is gone. While the adults brush off the death, Shaun & his mate Will are forced to open their own investigation. Their adventures will take them all around town in their race to find justice for the Man on the Lake. . . The protagonist Burton has created is one young boys will connect with. Shaun is just an Shaun is a kid in a small mining town in rural Qld. One day, he spots a man floating face down in a lake. He rushes to report his finding to the police, but when they come back, the body is gone. While the adults brush off the death, Shaun & his mate Will are forced to open their own investigation. Their adventures will take them all around town in their race to find justice for the Man on the Lake. . . The protagonist Burton has created is one young boys will connect with. Shaun is just an average kid with big dreams - solve the crime, make his mum proud and bag the girl, all while having time for a Maccas run at the end. He dreams about being the hero, in dubious and hilarious scenarios that would seem real to a young kid (hello medal of honour). It’s a coming of age story which was reminiscent of Stand by Me with a bit of the Hardy Boys thrown in for good measure. Burton has the vernacular of a teen boy down, so the dialogue feels real, as does Shaun’s self doubt, also reminiscent of the uncertainty of youth. . . When he finally gets some answers, Shaun discovers that life is not always so black and white, with every loose end packed away neatly. Towards the end, I found myself tripping over the pages and words to see what happened next. I have to say, I didn’t see that twist coming at all, which is a credit to the author. . . The novel touches on the themes of isolation and the struggle of making it work in a small mining town. There are themes of suicide, grief & depression, but these are handled delicately and in an age appropriate way. . . All in all this was a great book, at times raw, laugh out loud funny and made me reminisce of days long gone (yes, I was also on the debate team 💅🏼). I can see it being taught in schoolrooms, the type of book that won’t make everyone groan as they pull out their copy. .

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Fairbairn

    The story kicks into action immediately with POV character Shaun finding a dead body floating in the lake. He runs (literally) to the cop shop for help, but by the time a Copper comes back with him to the lake the body is gone, and Shaun looks like a liar. Only Shaun's best mate Will believes him and together they mount their own investigation. The fast who-done-it pace pushes you through the story, rapidly flipping to the pages to find out the who's, whats, whens, and hows. After some sleuthing, The story kicks into action immediately with POV character Shaun finding a dead body floating in the lake. He runs (literally) to the cop shop for help, but by the time a Copper comes back with him to the lake the body is gone, and Shaun looks like a liar. Only Shaun's best mate Will believes him and together they mount their own investigation. The fast who-done-it pace pushes you through the story, rapidly flipping to the pages to find out the who's, whats, whens, and hows. After some sleuthing, interfering and putting themselves in danger the boys do ultimately catch the "bad guys", but it doesn't exactly go down how you think it will. On the surface this is a fun, captivating, page-turning who-done-it mystery. But it really does highlight the darker human casually side of the mining industry, of small mining towns, of the working conditions /quality of live /mental health dangers of such a money hungry industry. The town the year ten students Shaun and Will call home grew into existence because of and revolves around coal mining. Will's dad was a coal miner who's declining physical health thanks to his job's poor conditions lead to the decline of his mental health, and later suicide. And then there is the man in the water and all the people involved in that - which for spoiler reasons I obviously won't go into. So while this is a fantastic who-done-it romp, with a relativity happy ending for the two boys we grow to care for, that I absolutely enjoyed reading - it does tell some hard truths - but it's done in a way I think kids will absorb without releasing it. This story is a must read for any and all #LoveOZYA aficionados and who-done-it mystery aficionados.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Trisha

    This is a mature crime thriller, entirely appropriate for senior boys. David Burton, author of his memoir, How to be Happy, has composed a realistic and familiar story, set in a Qld mining town. His main character Shaun solves the mystery without too many incidental or contrived situations. Shaun is invested because he discovers the body, is attracted to a family member, and has little else to do with his time in this small community. Plus, there’s the distraction it offers from the ongoing This is a mature crime thriller, entirely appropriate for senior boys. David Burton, author of his memoir, How to be Happy, has composed a realistic and familiar story, set in a Qld mining town. His main character Shaun solves the mystery without too many incidental or contrived situations. Shaun is invested because he discovers the body, is attracted to a family member, and has little else to do with his time in this small community. Plus, there’s the distraction it offers from the ongoing grief of losing his father. His best mate, Will, an aboriginal boy is a contrast and counterpoint to the intensely determined Shaun. His large happy family and easy going manner provides support and acceptance when everyone else seems to regard Shaun with suspicion and concern. The tragic circumstances surrounding this particular mysterious death create a sadness reflecting Shaun’s mental state, and his mum’s insistence that he sees a counsellor is a welcome touch. Ultimately, Burton is making a political comment, a message for both governments and corporations about a topic that young people are unfortunately too aware of: power and corruption often go hand in hand with injustice and disregard of individuals who try to eek out a living from an increasingly uncaring society. This writing is strong and authentic.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen Bernet-Ward

    David Burton has written a tightly woven and highly readable mystery story. He keeps the pressure up, and keeps it real. Shaun sees a man’s body floating in the local lake and when he returns with Constable Charlie Thompson the body has gone. Shaun begins to investigate the mysterious death and uncovers far more than he ever imagined. A tenacious young man, Shaun is determined to solve the puzzle but the subtext throughout the story is ‘Who believes Shaun actually saw the man in the water?’. Not David Burton has written a tightly woven and highly readable mystery story. He keeps the pressure up, and keeps it real. Shaun sees a man’s body floating in the local lake and when he returns with Constable Charlie Thompson the body has gone. Shaun begins to investigate the mysterious death and uncovers far more than he ever imagined. A tenacious young man, Shaun is determined to solve the puzzle but the subtext throughout the story is ‘Who believes Shaun actually saw the man in the water?’. Not many people, it seems. Even his mother Linda struggles to accept the situation, although a family death may be clouding her reasoning. Shaun does appear to have a kind of obsessional limerence. Fortunately Shaun has a keen ally in his long-time friend Will, a larrikin with a charming manner, and they believe the drowned man was murdered. They negotiate their way through a minefield of possibilities, taking risks, and discovering the mental and physical challenges faced by coal workers and their families. Both Shaun and Will are on the school debating team with Megan Grant. Shaun adores Megan from afar and he imagines a future of ‘happy ever afters’ together. Set in a gritty, rundown Queensland coal mining town, the atmosphere is hot, dry and pulsating with subtle undercurrents from personal relationships through to shonky mining regulations. My assumptions were overturned, clues were flipped and hopes were dashed. From angry picket lines headed by volatile Peter Grant, head of the mine workers union, to various forms of small town mindset, Shaun’s investigations pull him deeper and deeper into a world of unanswered questions. I loved the way David Burton’s characters did the opposite to what I expected, making them fallible yet understandable. I was absorbed into the intrigue, and Shaun’s proactive role kept up the pace. I have no hesitation in saying ‘The Man in the Water’ is an excellent mystery for young adults and older readers. Quote from Chapter 32 “From the sky, Shaun’s home town looked like it was surrounded by yawning black holes. It was epic. The mines were colossal dark wounds in the earth, the town a sort of defiance among the rubble. It was a god’s sandpit. He pressed his face against the window and watched as the earth turned with the plane. They were coming in to land.” Images on my blog https://thoughtsbecomewords.com/2019/...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nic

    The Man In The Water follows Shaun, a high school kid, who discovers a body floating in the local lake. After going to the local police station to report it, he returns to the site with the constable to find the body is gone, and now no one seems to believe that there was ever a body there to begin with. This is an enjoyable “YA whodunnit” read, that also tackles issues of suicide, mental health and grief. It’s quite emotionally raw at times, and it seemed like a very realistic take on the The Man In The Water follows Shaun, a high school kid, who discovers a body floating in the local lake. After going to the local police station to report it, he returns to the site with the constable to find the body is gone, and now no one seems to believe that there was ever a body there to begin with. This is an enjoyable “YA whodunnit” read, that also tackles issues of suicide, mental health and grief. It’s quite emotionally raw at times, and it seemed like a very realistic take on the perspective of a teenage boy that has been through trauma, and also has somewhat immature heroic fantasies of himself which made me laugh. I’ll admit that the “kids solving crimes” trope isn’t my favourite because it can have certain unbelievable aspects, but then again this is the nature of this genre, and it's becoming really popular with YA audiences these days. I definitely didn’t pick that ending - it kept me guessing until the final reveal! I think this would be a really great book for teenagers and YA lovers who also enjoy the crime genre, as it has elements of mystery and intrigue, but also tackles mental health issues which is so important for teenagers to think about in this day and age.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Fotini

    Actual rating: 3.5/5

  10. 4 out of 5

    Danielle {halfdesertedstreets}

    Delicious outback noir for a young adult audience. Review soon!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Emsy

    Even though this book is aimed at teenagers, I couldn’t put it down! I was so enthralled by the adventures of Shaun and Will & the mystery of The Man In The Water. This is the kind of book that will encourage teenagers, particular boys, to read...and to really enjoy it! In amongst the drama, fun, and intrigue is a serious and familiar story about mental health, particularly regarding men in rural Australia. The resources at the end (beyond blue etc), for anyone experiencing tough times, are Even though this book is aimed at teenagers, I couldn’t put it down! I was so enthralled by the adventures of Shaun and Will & the mystery of The Man In The Water. This is the kind of book that will encourage teenagers, particular boys, to read...and to really enjoy it! In amongst the drama, fun, and intrigue is a serious and familiar story about mental health, particularly regarding men in rural Australia. The resources at the end (beyond blue etc), for anyone experiencing tough times, are important and appropriate. I highly recommend David Burton’s first novel! A thoroughly enjoyable read for people of all ages.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    In my opinion, this is the perfect cover for the story behind it. I absolutely love the vibrant blue colour and the swirling details. And the font is quite different, though I find it really pretty. When I read the blurb of 'The Man In The Water' by David Burton, I simply knew that I need to read this book. The author's writing style is actually quite refreshing with its typical Australian accent, which I could easily imagine while reading. For me, this story was completely new ground but the In my opinion, this is the perfect cover for the story behind it. I absolutely love the vibrant blue colour and the swirling details. And the font is quite different, though I find it really pretty. When I read the blurb of 'The Man In The Water' by David Burton, I simply knew that I need to read this book. The author's writing style is actually quite refreshing with its typical Australian accent, which I could easily imagine while reading. For me, this story was completely new ground but the whole time, I was right there with the amazing characters because of David's thrilling, fast-paced, and intriguing writing style. I could barely put the book aside. The setting is very well thought through and the author describes everything in a detailed manner. I could see every scene clearly in my imagination and loved the rural setting of the story. There has also been a quite high emotional part in this story, as you can imagine that the main character Shaun goes through a lot in his situation. The book works through the topic of mental health issues of teenagers, which I guess is not made for everyone. Every here and there, the story threw me back to my own past but the triggers haven't been too bad. 'The Man In The Water' has been my first book by David Burton and what a first book it was! I can absolutely recommend this stunning work to you, if you like a good mix of Mystery and Thriller, combined with a good portion of emotions and critical topics, such as mental health. The author did an amazing job here and surprises his readers with his fast-paced, highly catching writing style and the wonderful characters. Reading Shaun's story has been a delight and for me, it's definitely been a highlight.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tim Arundell

    A page turner from start to finish I enjoyed the persistence of the main character (young Shaun) in following his conscience to solve the mystery of the dead body he encountered in the lake in his rural home community.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cass Moriarty

    Author David Burton is well-known for his playwriting, his work with the Queensland Music Festival, and his award-winning non-fiction book for young people, How to Be Happy. His first novel, The Man in the Water (UQP 2019), is a page-turning and suspenseful YA story that combines a coming of age narrative with the mystery of a murder to be solved. The book opens with the line: ‘On the first day of Year 10, Shaun sees a dead body.’ A great opening, which leads us directly into the lives of the Author David Burton is well-known for his playwriting, his work with the Queensland Music Festival, and his award-winning non-fiction book for young people, How to Be Happy. His first novel, The Man in the Water (UQP 2019), is a page-turning and suspenseful YA story that combines a coming of age narrative with the mystery of a murder to be solved. The book opens with the line: ‘On the first day of Year 10, Shaun sees a dead body.’ A great opening, which leads us directly into the lives of the two main characters, Shaun and his best friend Will, 16-year-olds growing up in a quiet mining town in outback Queensland. Shaun is alone at the town’s lake when he sees the dead body floating face-down. He can’t quite believe what he’s seen, and he immediately rushes to the police station to report what he’s found. But when the local constable drives Shaun back to the same spot, the body is gone. Completely disappeared. The cops think Shaun is making the whole thing up, perhaps in some sort of grief response to losing his own father a year earlier. His mother is so worried about his mental health that she arranges for him to see a psychologist. But Shaun knows what he saw, and along with Will, the only other person who believes him, they set out to investigate the incident themselves. I powered through this novel. The teenage characters are well-drawn and the dialogue is whip-smart and spot-on. The plot races along as we, the readers, travel this journey with Shaun as he tries to uncover the truth. Aside from a couple of distracting points related to leads or clues inexplicably not followed up by the police, this is an engaging story that is the perfect holiday read for adolescents. Almost every chapter ends with a cliff-hanger that ensures you keep reading. Burton writes deftly around the issues of grief, family dysfunction, mental health and suicide, and his experience of working with young people affected by these issues has obviously informed his writing – the narrative is sensitive, thoughtful and insightful. Added to that is the intriguing plot and the idea of a young man determined to follow his nose and find out the truth, despite being disbelieved and mocked, and suffering a lack of self-esteem for various reasons. There is also the innocent and tentative blooming of a romantic interest, which is delivered with all the associated angst and self-doubt and trepidation that 16-year-olds suffer. Burton’s depictions of the dynamics of relationships – between friends, between family members, between students and teachers – are all well-crafted and believable. And despite the subject matter, the book is very funny. Shaun and Will are endearing, clumsy, loveable teenage boys, and their laconic wit and dry sense of humour shine through on every page. This is a murder mystery for teens, age-appropriate and yet filled with drama, high stakes (and hi-vis vests), and the everyday frustrations of being an adolescent with little autonomy in a life dictated by adults and their rules. But it’s also a story of one boy’s determination to believe in himself and uncover the truth.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ally

    "Fun little murder mystery that keeps you guessing." This book was sent to me as part of The Man In The Water blog tour in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. This novel follows the story of Shaun, an Australian high schooler who finds a body in a lake on a hot afternoon. After running to the police to tell them of what he found, the body goes missing and no one believes he saw a body in the first place. So Shaun decides to investigate to see if he can figure out the mystery "Fun little murder mystery that keeps you guessing." This book was sent to me as part of The Man In The Water blog tour in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. This novel follows the story of Shaun, an Australian high schooler who finds a body in a lake on a hot afternoon. After running to the police to tell them of what he found, the body goes missing and no one believes he saw a body in the first place. So Shaun decides to investigate to see if he can figure out the mystery behind the disappearance of the man in the water. From the first sentence, the reader is thrown into the murder mystery as it slowly consumes Shaun’s every thought. Shaun’s character is fleshed out and felt very real. He truly was a teenager dealing with personal problems, school, wanting the girl he fancied to notice him while trying to prove his small town in the Aussie outback that he wasn’t lying. It reminded me of the days when I was a teen and adults refused to believe me just because I was a kid who didn’t know any better. Shaun was human, desperately seeking approval, attention and making mistakes. But unlike other YA protagonist, Shaun understands his mistakes and tries very hard to make amends rather than brushing them off. We need YA protagonists like this! The plot overall was enjoyable. David Burton kept me second-guessing on who the “murderer” was and I was pleased that it is revealed in the end. The story also gave us a look into the life of coal workers in the outback which is a point of view I have never encountered since most stories happen in big cities or towns. It touched on topics on how the industry and mining companies affect a community and its families. The Man in the Water was overall a pleasant read and would recommend to anyone wanting to read a quick YA thriller with an uncommon setting.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Em

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Actual rating: 2.5 Points for the gorgeous cover Points for the indigenous character calling out the transparency of their white faculty's goal to showcase their school's diversity Point (!!) for having an indigenous character in the first place The best friend of color here is a Ron Weasley-esque sidekick with a big family and I'm still contemplating if he's been subjected to a stereotype. The voice of the self-absorbed thirteen-year-olds were accurate. The story was fast-paced and Actual rating: 2.5 ✅ Points for the gorgeous cover ✅ Points for the indigenous character calling out the transparency of their white faculty's goal to showcase their school's diversity ✅ Point (!!) for having an indigenous character in the first place The best friend of color here is a Ron Weasley-esque sidekick with a big family and I'm still contemplating if he's been subjected to a stereotype. The voice of the self-absorbed thirteen-year-olds were accurate. The story was fast-paced and straightforward and, most importantly, brief, but the narration was confusing, as if it skipped crucial scenes. I ended up feeling like I had missed big clues (someone noted in their review that there's a cheating plot here and I don't even remember that!). I definitely was surprised at the events that led to the culprit being the culprit all this time, but maybe that's the patriarchy for you: to quote Ocean's Eight, "A him gets noticed, a her gets ignored."

  17. 5 out of 5

    justme.millie

    I enjoyed reading The Man In The Water by David Burton, it was a fast paced easy read that instantly transported me to a small mining town in North Queensland, Following Shaun and his best friend Will as they to figure out who the dead man is, how he came to be in the lake and where he has dissapered to. I really liked how David Burton touched on many issues that are effecting regional towns in Australia and also life issues as Shaun is navigating life after the loss of a loved one This is very I enjoyed reading The Man In The Water by David Burton, it was a fast paced easy read that instantly transported me to a small mining town in North Queensland, Following Shaun and his best friend Will as they to figure out who the dead man is, how he came to be in the lake and where he has dissapered to. I really liked how David Burton touched on many issues that are effecting regional towns in Australia and also life issues as Shaun is navigating life after the loss of a loved one This is very much a Whodunnit that will keep you guessing till the end! I would compare this to books by Jane Harper, which I absolutely love but The Man In The Water would be great for slightly younger teen readers.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Shannon

    Set in a small Australian outback mining town. Shaun has not recovered from the death of his father nine months ago. His mother is concerned for his wellbeing, so when Shaun reveals he has seen a dead body in the local waterhole, no-one believes him. Shaun went to the police to report the body but when they returned the body had gone. Shaun and his best mate Will are determined to find out who dead man is and how he came to be floating in the waterhole.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Kate

    At first I didn’t think I’d like this book. I only read the first 2 chapters and put it back down for a few days before picking it up again. Once I got a few chapters in, I started getting intrigued and got into the story abit more. Will and Shaun we’re both very likeable characters and it was a fun little mystery that kept me guessing until the end.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Linley

    Good, well-told story set in a small Australian mining town. The usual small town one-employer problems surface to create a mystery and a tense situation for two Y10 lads. Recommended to good readers from Y9-Y13. Plenty to relate to, but not an in-your-face-full-of-grit story.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kieran Humphreys

    Such a gripping mystery with an extremely satisfying ending. I will never get sick of reading books set in Australia, this book feels like home. I also greatly appreciate the list of mental health resources at the end of the book :)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Strachan

    Classified as a YA novel, this mystery deals with some gritty issues - suicide in particular. A page turner. Well written and most suited to children over 15.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Terri

    Another YA mystery novel, but this time a convincing one. The characters were real and the plot almost believable. I didn’t pick the villain before the big reveal at the end.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

    3.5 Stars! Review to come 5/10/19.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Liz Derouet

    A good mystery for teens, started off strong, dipped a little for me at about 3/4 way but then came back and ended strongly. Wish this book was around when I was in my last job!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gill

    Enjoyable read. Full review: http://www.gillyreads.com/review-the-...

  27. 5 out of 5

    The Purposeful Prose

  28. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Taylor

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cathie May

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