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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Other Stories (Barnes & Noble Leatherbound Classics Series)

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30 review for Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Other Stories (Barnes & Noble Leatherbound Classics Series)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Duane

    It may not be the most beloved children's story ever, but it may be the best known. With a cast of characters known the world over, and reproduced in every entertainment form imaginable, it's made "Alice" the one word name that everyone recognizes as Lewis Carroll's iconic character. And there is an unnerving quality about it that leaves you thinking that, just maybe, this crazy world does exist somewhere in some dimension, and that we make wake up some morning and find ourselves in the It may not be the most beloved children's story ever, but it may be the best known. With a cast of characters known the world over, and reproduced in every entertainment form imaginable, it's made "Alice" the one word name that everyone recognizes as Lewis Carroll's iconic character. And there is an unnerving quality about it that leaves you thinking that, just maybe, this crazy world does exist somewhere in some dimension, and that we make wake up some morning and find ourselves in the "Twilight Zone" of Alice's Wonderland.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    The time has come,' the Walrus said, To talk of many things: Of shoes and ships and sealing-wax Of cabbages and kings And why the sea is boiling hot And whether pigs have wings.' (Quote from Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There ' written by none other than the fantastical Lewis Carroll) As per usual, as Alice happens to be my favorite story of all time... 5, BADDA BING BADDA BOOM, golden STARS. Have to add that this edition is also truly beautiful one; a wonderful edition The time has come,' the Walrus said, To talk of many things: Of shoes — and ships — and sealing-wax — Of cabbages — and kings — And why the sea is boiling hot — And whether pigs have wings.' (Quote from Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There ' written by none other than the fantastical Lewis Carroll) As per usual, as Alice happens to be my favorite story of all time... 5, BADDA BING BADDA BOOM, golden STARS. Have to add that this edition is also truly beautiful one; a wonderful edition added to my Alice collection that I keep proudly displayed on my built-in HIDDEN BOOKSHELF DOOR that the hubs & I made years ago. I only wish a new magic, imaginary world was behind it; instead it’s just a hallway with a storage closet leading to a linen closet, and my closet, plus the master bathroom & pool door hahahh. What good is a secret door with no magic inside?! (Well it’s still pretty damn cool guys; not gonna lie lol).

  3. 4 out of 5

    Asghar Abbas

    After all the metaphors and symbolism regarding Alice, the White Rabbit, the Mad Hatter in beaver hat, and going down the Rabbit holes, it was surreal reading the Original thing after all that but it wasn't surreal enough. Now this is a children's book in every way and more. Well worth the wait, didn't let down and did not disappoint in any way. It was everything I thought it would be and more. Much much more. All the hype surrounding it well justified. Now this is living up to the expectations. After all the metaphors and symbolism regarding Alice, the White Rabbit, the Mad Hatter in beaver hat, and going down the Rabbit holes, it was surreal reading the Original thing after all that but it wasn't surreal enough. Now this is a children's book in every way and more. Well worth the wait, didn't let down and did not disappoint in any way. It was everything I thought it would be and more. Much much more. All the hype surrounding it well justified. Now this is living up to the expectations. There are many lessons, morals, and parables here, but you have to work at it and figure them out. A book that simulates your mind. It me took me a while to figure out that every line, every word, every dialogue was a puzzle that you have to unravel yourself. Lot's of double entendres here. Just brilliant. I applaud the ending. It was abrupt like startling awake from a pleasant dream. Really wow. Perfect. Like the goodreads sensation JG Keely says a good children's book works for both adults and children and makes you think. This book does that aplenty. It was like Alice was there in Wonderland, and we as readers were there with her. Seeing every kooky thing first hand and were just as amazed, awed, and enthralled as her. Think. Was it all a dream? Was she sleeping all her life? Was she dreaming? Is she still dreaming? Is this still a dream? Is she ? You gotta Wonder just who was it that really woke her up? Red pill or the blue one, I know what I am taking. We all know which one Russell Brand took. Which one would you take ? Was it a dream?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    How am I supposed to explain all this? I swear Lewis Carroll was on drugs. If you asked me to make up something as wildly insane as this, I wouldn't even come close. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass are exactly as I remembered the films. They're insane and brilliant all at once. It was the Sylvie & Bruno books that took me the longest to get through, because I honestly had no idea what was going on at times. The basic premise is the narrator going along on his How am I supposed to explain all this? I swear Lewis Carroll was on drugs. If you asked me to make up something as wildly insane as this, I wouldn't even come close. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass are exactly as I remembered the films. They're insane and brilliant all at once. It was the Sylvie & Bruno books that took me the longest to get through, because I honestly had no idea what was going on at times. The basic premise is the narrator going along on his normal life, but he falls into an "eerie" state (akin to the place between being awake and dreaming) that he encounters fairy children. But the fairy children sometimes become real children, and I don't even know. What was that all about. I did enjoy Carroll's poetry, though, overall. It's silly and fun. All right, I skimmed through the stuff in the end because it included a lot of math. And some instruction of how to play card games. I suppose every anthology needs those random bits at the end. I honestly don't believe I finished this monstrosity of a book. Although I have been trying to read it for the past seven months.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Åsgård

    This is the first Barnes & Noble Leatherbound Classic book I have read, and judging by only the cover, it's absolutely astounding. Cute and pink with wonderful artwork, and pages dipped in gold which gives the pages that ''old'' vintage feeling! The first two parts of the book is of course the Alice books - I finished those in a day each, it was wonderful reliving my childhood, and also learning more about the books, as the Disney and Tim Burton movies are just mere interpretations. I loved This is the first Barnes & Noble Leatherbound Classic book I have read, and judging by only the cover, it's absolutely astounding. Cute and pink with wonderful artwork, and pages dipped in gold which gives the pages that ''old'' vintage feeling! The first two parts of the book is of course the Alice books - I finished those in a day each, it was wonderful reliving my childhood, and also learning more about the books, as the Disney and Tim Burton movies are just mere interpretations. I loved the books even more! The next two parts are the Sylvie and Bruno books, which were wonderful and cute! Really recommend those if you like the Alice books, but are heavier to read as they are longer and with no pictures – So I wouldn’t really recommend it to a younger child. But the fun doesn’t end here! There’s LOTS of other goodies to discover. Verses, puzzles, poems, stories, and a big ‘’miscellany’’ chunk with lots of fun stuff! There are even mathematical problems and equations or those who are smart enough! Riddles and guides are also included. So if you’re a fan of Mr. Lewis Carroll and Victorian literature, get this book at once! At only $18, it’s even worth it if you just buy it just to read the Alice stories! Here in Norway they sell some books from the Leatherbound Classic series for a whopping $41.50 each! I bought this and another book from the series, and with shipping the total was only $54.50! So I will continue ordering from Barnes & Noble in the future! Hope to collect all the books one day. What are you waiting for? Click Add to Bag now!! Happy reading! - Caroline Carnivorous

  6. 5 out of 5

    Yelena

    This particular edition is part of Barnes & Noble's Leather-bound Classics Collection. Carroll's volume is bound by distinctive pink bonded leather, with black illustration and gold leaf embellishment; "Beautiful" is an understatement when describing this collection; it's exquisite - to say the least! These books are so precious to me. They are the epitome of what my "dream library" will contain; breath-taking editions of the classics and masterpieces. Most of the books in this particular This particular edition is part of Barnes & Noble's Leather-bound Classics Collection. Carroll's volume is bound by distinctive pink bonded leather, with black illustration and gold leaf embellishment; "Beautiful" is an understatement when describing this collection; it's exquisite - to say the least! These books are so precious to me. They are the epitome of what my "dream library" will contain; breath-taking editions of the classics and masterpieces. Most of the books in this particular collection include the author's entire volume of published literary works (many with beautiful illustrations and rare content, such as pieces that have never been published anywhere other than their original editions); "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Other Stories" is no exception!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Luzie

    I decided just to read "Alice in Wonderland" and "Alice - Through the Looking Glass", and "Puzzles from Wonderland" since that's the main reason I bought this book in the first place. And in the aftermath of my thoughts I decided that the other stories in this book, I can either read later or just ignore since I don't have the motivation or desire to actually read them. I think Alice's stories were kind of whimsical, but in a generally understanding and wonderful way. I had to take a lot of I decided just to read "Alice in Wonderland" and "Alice - Through the Looking Glass", and "Puzzles from Wonderland" since that's the main reason I bought this book in the first place. And in the aftermath of my thoughts I decided that the other stories in this book, I can either read later or just ignore since I don't have the motivation or desire to actually read them. I think Alice's stories were kind of whimsical, but in a generally understanding and wonderful way. I had to take a lot of breaks for this book, since it was just a book I read to fill the time in between other books. Therefore it took sooo long to finish it. But generally the stories were a little of what I expected and a lot of weirdness. The old language though, was a little heavy and headache-inducing. All in all, this was an okay book! 3/5 stars

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matilda Chapman

    First of all, this edition of the book is just gorgeous. Secondly, I'm not really going to review the book per say because let's face it, Carroll is a strange yet fascinating writer whose work barely makes any sense. His writing is unintelligible most of the time, yet the stories of Alice and her adventures in Wonderland are highly acclaimed, perhaps purely because they are so original? I don't know what to think of Lewis Carroll as a person, or as an author. All I know is that Alice's First of all, this edition of the book is just gorgeous. Secondly, I'm not really going to review the book per say because let's face it, Carroll is a strange yet fascinating writer whose work barely makes any sense. His writing is unintelligible most of the time, yet the stories of Alice and her adventures in Wonderland are highly acclaimed, perhaps purely because they are so original? I don't know what to think of Lewis Carroll as a person, or as an author. All I know is that Alice's Adventure's In Wonderland and Through The Looking Glass - the latter in my opinion, being the better of the two - have had a profound effect on me throughout my life. I'll probably never dive into his other tales, because his writing just isn't that appealing to me, but the Alice stories are some that I'll read over and over again, because you take something away from them every time you do, and that to me is the work of a great storyteller.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Such a strange tale. I've always been so enchanted by it though -- especially the cryptic rhymes interspersed. Are they meant to mean anything? Are the "morals" presented throughout the book to be taken seriously...or are they Carroll's idea of satirizing the moralizing books of his time period? Alice falls into the rabbit hole with society's rules in mind. She takes the virtues and rules from school and her parents...and she finds that they don't apply. Much like Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Such a strange tale. I've always been so enchanted by it though -- especially the cryptic rhymes interspersed. Are they meant to mean anything? Are the "morals" presented throughout the book to be taken seriously...or are they Carroll's idea of satirizing the moralizing books of his time period? Alice falls into the rabbit hole with society's rules in mind. She takes the virtues and rules from school and her parents...and she finds that they don't apply. Much like Robinson Crusoe, she is utterly stranded, and none of her knowledge helps her at all. She has no choice but to adapt to the rules of Wonderland's inhabitants, and go along with what seems to her to be nonsense, but for them, is real life. Even without delving into the technicalities of the novel, one can enjoy Alice's Adventures in Wonderland just because of the whimsical characters and simple story. I personally love the Duchess and Pig. I'm not even entirely sure why, but I laugh whenever I read that. Carroll's use of puns is also amusing. Great read. Through the Looking-Glass This book made me better understand why when people think Lewis Carroll, they think "drugged-out crazy dude." Alice's trip through the looking-glass definitely has the feel of one psychedelic trip. First she's playing chess (in hopes of becoming a queen)and all of the squares are bizarre settings that meld into one another in a fashion that is so dreamy and hazy that it makes the reader feel intoxicated. The themes presented in Through the Looking-Glass are very similar to those in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, which explains why they are so frequently sold together. Once again, Alice is confronted by a world where no one cares about her opinion, the standards she is accustomed to in her world are irrelevant, and she is almost entirely without help or guidance. Despite these seemingly dark elements, Carroll makes the story playful and whimsical. Hmmm. I noticed particularly in this installment that Alice is almost constantly insulted, ignored, and looked down upon. This poor seven-year-old child has to maintain a polite, calm state of mind through all sorts of insult and injury. I think that this is a remarkable feat for such a young child...in fact, I'm not entirely sure that I could be so calm and patient! A confusing, bumpy, psychedelic installment -- but a great piece nonetheless. Sylvie and Bruno I'm sorry, hold up. Did I say that Through the Looking-Glass was trippy? It's nothing compared to this installment. In fact, throughout most of Sylvie and Bruno, I was only 50% sure that I was correct about what was even happening. This must have been when addiction set it for Mr. Carroll! However, I will say that I adore both Sylvie and Bruno, despite their sickeningly sweet relationship (hmmm...satire or reality?) and Sylvie's irritating goody-two-shoes attitude. Their brother-sister relationship is so incredibly cute, even if it can come off as cloying on occasion. My favorite part of Sylvie and Bruno was Bruno's precious little-boy voice. I wanted to say "Aww!" out loud every time Bruno said "welly" for "really" or "oo" for "you" or made precious little grammatical mistakes. Seriously. Maybe it's because I'm a kid person and I love that toddler-esque sound, but I thought it really added to the authenticity of the novel and my enjoyment in the book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Priscila Palomares

    This is my favorite book! i absolutely love it and would recommend it to anyone who loves puzzles, riddles and poems.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Jadevaia

    I'll stick to the Disney movie. This was a bit trippy for me. Definitely a nice classic to read the original and understand the original story though.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gemma

    My favourite edition of my favourite story. I am sat re-reading Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and still smile at every page.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Gonzales

    Been eyeing this adorable pink & gold leatherbound edition for months. On a whim I finally walked into Barnes & Noble and bought it. When I got home that same night, I finished Alice's Adventures in a sitting. Such an easy and lovable read for me; I have many, many times before. Even as an adult I feel akin to Alice still. Happy to have this on my shelf and to dive into "Other Stories" within the next few months/years, whenever that mood strikes.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lelani

    I hated this book. I loved the movie as kid, and I thought that I would like this as well, but when you read it - it's like reading the experience of a drug addict that is high.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gabriela Freitas

    I really enjoyed Alice in Wonderland and the sequel, but I couldn't read past chapter 7 of Sylvie and Bruno or the two poems.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina

    This wasnt my favorite movie growing up and its not my favorite childrens book either but the metaphors are fun and its cool visualize some parts of the movie as I read the story This wasn’t my favorite movie growing up and it’s not my favorite children’s book either but the metaphors are fun and it’s cool visualize some parts of the movie as I read the story

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nicolle

    I only read the Alice parts

  18. 4 out of 5

    Grace Rowan

    This classic story should be read my people of all ages. I enjoyed reading it because it was out of the ordinary and similar to the movie. In addition, the character Alice is portrayed as a very independent young girl transitioning into adulthood. Wonderland is a whimsical place full of fantasy and magic that is synonymous with childhood stories that everyone enjoys.

  19. 5 out of 5

    McKenna

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This story is about a young girl, Alice, who encounters dreamlike experiences in her own bad dream. Alice winds up in a land where irregular and wacky symbolism proliferates, personality is continually shifting, and language frequently flourishes as a methods for correspondence. Alice found her identity by the end of the book, from her wicked adventures in Wonderland. In her fantasy adventure in Wonderland, Alice experienced emotional and physical changes, encounters various creatures, and This story is about a young girl, Alice, who encounters dreamlike experiences in her own bad dream. Alice winds up in a land where irregular and wacky symbolism proliferates, personality is continually shifting, and language frequently flourishes as a methods for correspondence. Alice found her identity by the end of the book, from her wicked adventures in Wonderland. In her fantasy adventure in Wonderland, Alice experienced emotional and physical changes, encounters various creatures, and encounters a loss of and a quest to finding her identity, as well as gaining back her self-confidence which leads her to returning back to reality. Personally, I didn't like the book. It wasn't my cup of tea.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Wowk

    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is a classic novel that shows a view of a child's imagination. The book represents the idea of growing up and the challenges people face on the adventure through adulthood. It is a great book filled with many different stories and adventures that allow readers to become interested in the stories. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland leaves you wanting more and allows you to venture back into your own childish imagination to explore Wonderland.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charles Moore

    This is silly stuff. And I loved every word of it. The puns, the word play, the jokes, the imagination all dig deep inside and remind me of all the seriousness that is nothing but construct and I had forgotten all the wonderful newness of the world. Without a doubt we take ourselves (particularly in our dotage) too seriously. I suspect that when we read Alice all those once-upon-a-time strange things in the world are strange things again and we giggle or smile or let the thought linger for a This is silly stuff. And I loved every word of it. The puns, the word play, the jokes, the imagination all dig deep inside and remind me of all the seriousness that is nothing but construct and I had forgotten all the wonderful newness of the world. Without a doubt we take ourselves (particularly in our dotage) too seriously. I suspect that when we read Alice all those once-upon-a-time strange things in the world are strange things again and we giggle or smile or let the thought linger for a moment. I bet you can't say that about any beach read. We meet all those wonderful folks: March Hare, Mad Hatter, Red Queen, White Rabbit, Mock Turtle. And they live up those silly puns (are there serious puns?) and word play that only the inner child wants to play with. In the introduction by Tan Lin is a comment about how we reacted to reading about the problem when Alice grows tall and thin and can't reach her feet. As an older adult, reaching my feet is still a problem! We know there are only a handful of stories that have lasted for years. They say something that seems to always need repeating. Maybe that's why some of us read about Alice's adventures. If you like the likes of "Alice" add "The Phantom Tollbooth" to your reading list. Through the Looking-Glass is commonly though of as a sequel to Alice's adventures and it reads that way, almost, but is also a stand-alone story. This is Alice's dream adventure triggered by the looking-glass where everything is backwards, of course. We meet the Walrus and the Carpenter, Humpty Dumpty, Tweedledee and Tweedledum, the Red Knight and White Knight, and red and white royalty. Everyone is in conflict with something else and most everyone can not do things correctly. I was thinking of the Beatles' "I Am The Walrus" while reading the poem about the walrus and the carpenter and the oysters. And, I was thinking about Don Quixote when Alice, in her last move on the chessboard that will bring her out of the looking-glass and back home, meets the clumsy, funny, but serious, White Knight. Carroll must have had fun in his days writing such silliness and I am happy to admit I had fun reading the same silliness. ###

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    It's a strange thing, these stories. "Alice in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There" are the more popular of Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson's, better known as Lewis Carroll, writings. They're definitely written for children but I do not think children of this day and age would enjoy it as much. There's a lot of mention of poetry and song and verse that only a child from 18th century England would get. But it's very fun either way. Probably best to read the It's a strange thing, these stories. "Alice in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There" are the more popular of Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson's, better known as Lewis Carroll, writings. They're definitely written for children but I do not think children of this day and age would enjoy it as much. There's a lot of mention of poetry and song and verse that only a child from 18th century England would get. But it's very fun either way. Probably best to read the stories to the children and act it out. It's meant to be fun, not as a commentary or anything. A lot of people don't understand this author's work and I think it can be best explained like this: say you're with a group of children and you've asked them to help you come up with a story. Just a silly story where anything can happen. So you come up with a character to follow which the children name. And then you come with a place where he or she can be going and they want the character to ride a tyrannosaurus rex into a river of melted chocolate and then the t-rex becomes a peanut butter and jelly sandwich because she's hungry. And then she becomes the Queen of Ice Cream and Marshmallow Land! That's kind of what's going on with these stories. They're utter nonsense and fun and it wouldn't surprise me at all to learn that Mr. Dodgson wrote Alice word for word on a boring afternoon with the help of some children he knew. The "Sylvie and Bruno" stories are a bit like the "Alice" stories, but the main difference is the narrator. I think he's either dying really slowly (he mentions he has a heart problem at the beginning of the story) or he has narcolepsy. Because he is constantly going to fairyland with Sylvie and Bruno or he's in the present with his mopey doctor friend who can't get the girl of his dreams. It's hard to follow at first but now it's just sort of weird. But I still found those stories interesting for all of their oddities. Unfortunately, I couldn't get myself to read anymore. It just became too much. Maybe I will finish it another day.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rikke

    "LOVE-lighted eyes, that will not start At frown of rage or malice! Uplifted brow, undaunted heart Ready to dine on raspberry-tart Along with fairy Alice!" Happy blabbering nonsense, puzzling riddles, surreal phantasms, a profound love for tea, talking rabbits, invisible fairies and a perfect understanding of how the world looks through the eyes of a child. That is the essential ingredients of Carroll's writing. No author has ever since made such magnificent wordplay and used such a heavy amount of "LOVE-lighted eyes, that will not start At frown of rage or malice! Uplifted brow, undaunted heart Ready to dine on raspberry-tart Along with fairy Alice!" Happy blabbering nonsense, puzzling riddles, surreal phantasms, a profound love for tea, talking rabbits, invisible fairies and a perfect understanding of how the world looks through the eyes of a child. That is the essential ingredients of Carroll's writing. No author has ever since made such magnificent wordplay and used such a heavy amount of absurdity as Lewis Carroll has - in all of his writing. The tale of Alice's fall into Wonderland illustrates perfectly how a child's imagination knows no boundaries. The lesser known story of Sylvie and Bruno is perhaps even stranger, as it combines the real world with fairies and a certain feeling of daydreams. But oh, Carroll's poetry! His poems are so silly, whimsical and funny; filled with important morales, sincere philosophy and meaningless nonsense. And they are clearly meant to be read aloud, as the rhymes are flowing so beautifully in a joyous rhythm. I have met so many people who have claimed to never fully understand "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland". But that is perhaps the point. Carroll's fanciful stories, miniature rhymes and bizarre characters aren't meant to be understood or overanalyzed. The magic of Carroll's writing lies in his way of comprehending the children's world and the illogical logic of childish imagination. No question marks are needed.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    First off: This is such a pretty book! Seriously! But well, about the Content.. I liked Alice's adventures in Wonderland and Throug the Lookingglass, I finished that in like two days. Bruno and Sylvie was pretty hard to read and I had no idea what was going on for most of the time. And that is actually a pretty good summary of the entire book: Hard to read and what's even going on? Some of the poetry was nice, some I didn't understand at all, and most of the time I was thinking: Seriously?! First off: This is such a pretty book! Seriously! But well, about the Content.. I liked Alice's adventures in Wonderland and Throug the Lookingglass, I finished that in like two days. Bruno and Sylvie was pretty hard to read and I had no idea what was going on for most of the time. And that is actually a pretty good summary of the entire book: Hard to read and what's even going on? Some of the poetry was nice, some I didn't understand at all, and most of the time I was thinking: Seriously?! Because Carroll is just so crazy. I don't know what he was thinking or if he was thinking at all while he was writing. And then there's the math stuff. Yeah, I'm not horrible at math, but I'm not great either and I just skimmed over most of those sections because I was so confused. And so many times there wasn't even a Point in anything he said. That was the part where I almost gave up. But I always finish books! I always do and I wouldn't let this be an exception, so I just waited a couple days, read three other books and came back to it. Luckily by then the math section was pretty much over and I got to some weird letters and rules for games. That wasn't necessarily interesting, but at least it was easier to read. So Overall the only Thing I actually liked was Alice and the Looks of the books and I'm very glad I'm through it!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    One day a curious little girl named Alice follows a rabbit down a rabbit-hole, and what ensues is a fantastical adventure that most people could not even dream up. After a constant act of shrinking and growing Alice meets the many characters of Wonderland, a blue caterpillar smoking a hookah, who's sentences tend to go round and round like an 8-track player, all ending with "Who are you?" She has tea with the Mad Hatter and the March Hare leaving more confused than when she arrived and drinking One day a curious little girl named Alice follows a rabbit down a rabbit-hole, and what ensues is a fantastical adventure that most people could not even dream up. After a constant act of shrinking and growing Alice meets the many characters of Wonderland, a blue caterpillar smoking a hookah, who's sentences tend to go round and round like an 8-track player, all ending with "Who are you?" She has tea with the Mad Hatter and the March Hare leaving more confused than when she arrived and drinking less tea than was expected. She also comes across the Cheshire Cat with his mysterious grin and the White Rabbit who introduced her to this curious land. Lastly she visits the beautiful garden of the Queen of Hearts, playing a strange game of croquet and witnessing a trial over stolen tarts. Alice In Wonderland is a very fun, quick read that is not just for children. The obscureness of Wonderland makes it all the more enjoyable, and sometimes wonder if Lewis Carroll added something magic to his tea while writing this story for a little girl.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kayleigh Prentice

    i picked up this volume to have a forever copy of alice in wonderland, to visit my cat and caterpillar anytime i want to, and hopefully share he same with my kids as bedtime stories. i had no idea what to expect from carrolls other works, as id never ventured beyond alices life. i was so pleasantly surprised by the sylvia and bruno chronicles. i really appreciated the social and political criticisms offered by the reality track (especially those concerning the pervasive duopoly culture of 1893- i picked up this volume to have a forever copy of “alice in wonderland,” to visit my cat and caterpillar anytime i want to, and hopefully share he same with my kids as bedtime stories. i had no idea what to expect from carroll’s other works, as i’d never ventured beyond alice’s life. i was so pleasantly surprised by the “sylvia and bruno” chronicles. i really appreciated the social and political criticisms offered by the “reality” track (especially those concerning the pervasive duopoly culture of 1893- time for change already), and the nonsense presented by the “eerie” track. but i most especially loved the when these worlds overlapped, as i can only think THAT is the true essence of life, fantasy and hard truths alike. the verse section had me laughing out loud. reading “the hunting of the snark” and “phantasmagoria” to my kids someday will surely be a highlight. 💗

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kayleigh Sparrow

    What can I say about Alice? This book has partly made me who I am! She is wonderfully innocent and curious, surrounded by a world of wonder. No film however hard they try will capture the magic. And this Barnes and Noble edition is so beautiful it some how manages to make the story even more special!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chaillé Snyder

    Alice in wonderland: this is so weird it's funny to me. I did appreciate this, but I'm glad it was a pretty short read or the nonsense would have been too much haha! To compare this to the Disney movie, it was really different and I actually prefer the movie just because it's what I'm used to. I'll definitely check out the looking glass hopefully soon :D

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Only read the first book in this huge set, but it was quite good. Probably will get around to the rest of it piecemeal. Never read Lewis Carroll before and I loved his use of riddles and wordplay. This will appeal to older fantasy geeks, but these crazy kids today might not like it much. Never was a fan of the original animated Disney film, but the Disney Tim Burton/Johnny Depp film is great.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ioana

    Loved it! Read parts of it when I was young, but then I only cared about the story. Great word-games, great metaphors (hope that's the English word for it), simply an amazing read to get you disconnected in smart way.

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